A weekend in Shanghai (Day 2 part 1)

Run in Blue is an annual event organised by Rotaract clubs (Rotary for people between 18 and 30) in China, supporting a cause. As you may be aware, I am part of Rotaract, Club of Suzhou and I helped organise the event in Suzhou, and proceeds went to the Sunflower Autism Centre in Suzhou. The Rotaract club of Shanghai organised the event to raise awareness about Down syndrome rehabilitation. Run in Blue partnered with the Sweet Angels, initiated by the Chinese Association for People with Intellectual Disability and their Relatives (CAPIDR), Down-Syndrome branch to supporting YBC Heathcare’s Down Syndrome Rehabilitation program.

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Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. It is typically associated with physical growth delays, characteristic facial features, and mild to moderate intellectual disability. The probability increases from less than 0.1% in 20-year-old mothers to 3% in those age 45. There is no cure for Down syndrome.Education and proper care have been shown to improve quality of life. Some children with Down syndrome are educated in typical school classes, while others require more specialized education. Some children with the down syndrome performed dance routines, played the trumpet or Chinese instruments like the hulusi during the event. This really showed that education and care really help the kids get better to integrate the society.

We left our hotel room at 7, but not without taking an #ootd picture.

We made our way for breakfast which was supposed to start at 7 until 09.30 am but breakfast wasn’t ready yet, so we decided to go to the subway and we would buy something from a Family Mart, a convenience store or a breakfast stall(Click to read about an article I wrote about Breakfast in China here). We took the subway and reached the registration a 08.00 a.m on the dot.

We were warmly welcomed by volunteers, got our t-shirts, and then we made our way to the stage, where many participants were already present.We found many stalls. There was a medical aid stall, a place to keep our bags safe(we wouldn’t want to run with our bags, would we?), a stall promoting an online grocery store,…

There was an introduction about the event and the cause that Run in Blue was supporting and speeches and of course an intense warm up session until 09.00 and then the fun began.

By that time, it was starting to rain lightly but I was excited nonetheless. I ran for the most part, but there was a point, where I got abdominal pain (stitch), and I had to walk for a little while. Other than that, I think it went great. When we were near the finish line, my friend and I decided to sprint to end the marathon beautifully and it was beautiful for me. I missed running, and sprinting. I used to run short-distances and that moment made me remember how much I love running.

All participants got a certificate, a medal and a gift bag. It was long since I “won” something and this feeling was all the more meaningful as it was of help to some children.

In order to prevent us from getting any muscle pain, we had to do some intense stretching, and boy o boy it felt like my body was being squeezed and muscles I didn’t even know existed said a big hi to me.

There was a few performances by some children with the down syndrome and it was so beautiful. I was truly impressed by their skills. They could dance and play instruments.

We watched an aqua yoga performance, which was truly incredible. Some volunteers were also able to perform some moves with the team. There was also salsa. We danced merrily and then there was laughter yoga. The latter made me uncomfortable but in a good way I think. I didn’t know that such a thing existed and it always feels weird to try out a new unknown thing. But it was soothing and very therapeutic.

I went back to the hotel with a light and happy heart.

Before ending this post I would like to talk to you about a challenge that the Rotaract Club of Shanghai also encouraged us to do; the #sugarbaechallenge. This challenge comes from the saying “When life gives you lemons, add sugar baby”, which is a translation of the Chinese saying “糖宝挑战“ (tang bao tiaozhan which literally means the sugar baby challenge). The challenge consists of sucking on a piece of lemon for 10 seconds (while making weird faces because of the taste of lemon) and then eating a lollipop just after. It is a challenge to raise awareness about the Down Syndrome. I have posted this challenge on my social medias, Instagram, Facebook, and Youtube, and I hope you watch it and do this challenge and nominate 3 of your friends to do it and post it on the socials with the hashtag #sugarbaechallenge, or #tangbaotiaozhan on Chinese social medias.


Thank you for reading! I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. Here are some links where you can read more about the Down Syndrome if you want to. And guess what, I continued on exploring Shanghai for the rest of the day! Click here for more:

A weekend in Shanghai (Day 1)

A weekend in Shanghai (Day 2 part 2)

A weekend in Shanghai (Day 3)

Down Syndrome wiki

What is Down Syndrome – National Down Syndrome Society?


If you are in Shanghai and would like to get in touch with Rotaract Shanghai or the cause they are supporting or their activities, here are the links:

Rotaract Shanghai’s Facebook

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